How to Foil Hijacking Attempts: Latest Breakthroughs

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The enigma of Amelia Earhart’s journey is still one of the most targeted topics. Even though 75 years have gone by, her mysterious disappearance is haunting and it is being explored and investigated by the enthusiasts of the aviation history. Interestingly enough, Directtv, Amelia became enticed by airplane racing in her early twenties. She was always considered controversial as her interests did not mirror the lady-like behavior of the era. She climbed trees as a child, and became fascinated by the male dominated professions such as law, mechanical engineering and advertising. Amelia had her first flying lesson in 1921 when she fell in love with the idea and decided to pursue her passion. She was able to purchase her first plane six months later. It was painted bright yellow, so she named it Canary. She used it to set her first record by raising the plane to an altitude of 14,000 feet. This accomplishment made her visible within the world of aviation and further accelerated her infatuation for flying. The recent news project Amelia’s possible emergency landing at the Nikumaroro Island in the Pacific where she might have landed and had no means of communicating her location. Her partner Fred Noonan has been assumed to land with Amelia. Many artifacts have been found on the island, but none of them are linking directly to Amelia or Fred. The hits keep comin’: Search for Amelia Earhart Begins Off Hawaii

Battle of Midway: 70 Years Later

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The Battle of Midway took place over a four day period between June fourth and June seventh. It is considered to be the pivotal naval battle in the Pacific Theatre during World War II.

After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese forces sought to further damage American naval power by attacking the remaining Pacific Fleet and the base on Midway. Midway also served as an important air base that allowed bombers to attack Japanese bases throughout the Pacific.

During the air portion of the battle, the Japanese used the Aichi D3A dive bomber along with the Nakajima B5N2 torpedo bomber. The Mitusbishi Zero provided fighter cover. Some of the Allied aircraft utilized at Midway included B-26 Marauders, the SBD Dauntless and the Brewster F2A-3.

The Japanese forces attacked Midway and US forces in the Pacific. The Midway base remained operational, and the Japanese fleet was attacked. American pilots sank four Japanese aircraft carriers.

The Allied forces won a major victory at the Battle of Midway. This battle, along with Allied success in the Solomon Islands, turned the tide of the Pacific war.

Airplanes in films.

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The fear of flying is one of the most common fears in the world, so it's no surprise that there are plenty of intense thrillers set on airplanes. It taps into a universal fear and uses it to tell a scary story. There are many kinds of stories set on airplanes, though. Whether they're funny, sad, sweet, or scary, these are some of the best airplane-based movies. 1. Airplane! (1980) One of the most well-known parodies, this movie is a zany comedy set on an airplane. Everyone on the plane is mysteriously getting sick, including the pilot, and a small team of unaffected passengers must take the plane home. It yielded many famous quotes, including this famous exchange: "Surely you can't be serious." "I am serious, and don't call me Shirley." 2. United 93 (2006). On a very different note, this very serious drama tells the true story of United 93, the only airplane in the attacks of September 11, 2001, to not reach its intended target. The reason its mission failed was that the passengers on the plan led a revolt against the terrorists, ultimately crashing the plane in Pennsylvania before it reached its final goal. The movie is a solemn tribute to those who lost their lives on that flight. 3. Red Eye (2005). If you've ever felt trapped on a flight, then you will identify with Rachel McAdams, who plays a hotel manager in this suspenseful thriller. She finds herself sitting next to a terrorist played by Cillian Murphy. While on the plane, he forces her to help him, saying he will tell a hit-man to kill her father if she doesn't go along with the plan. The movie is claustrophobic, tense, and smart as McAdams tries to find a way to break away. 4. Air Force One (1997). This action thriller is set on a very special airplane: Air Force One. Harrison Ford plays the President of the United States, whose airplane is being hijacked by terrorists. His wife and daughter are traveling with him, so he must keep them safe while confronting the terrorists' demands. All these movies and more are available with some Direct TV Deals like On Demand.

The Future of Aviation: The Face of Flying in the 21st Century

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While nobody knows for sure the future of flying, there are certain current trends that will likely carry forward to the future. One trend that is likely to continue is increased regulation of airlines. It wasn't just the terrorist attacks that drove this, but also the increased losses by airline companies. The airline industry is susceptible to large losses with fuel spikes. Maintaining government regulation will be a likely requirement to ensure safety within the industry, as well as to support a failing airline industry.

This regulation and security will be a theme for commercial flight passengers as well. Expect that flying in the 21st century will involve increased security checks for passengers and thorough and quick background checks. As these processes become computerized, expect to be more thoroughly examined when arriving at the airport. When you are at the gate, the expected trend is for this step to be more mechanized with electorinc scanners examining you and making sure you have the appropriate boarding ticket.

Aviation often changes in ways that we cannot predict. New innovations improve performance and safety in ways that are not currently thought off. An increase in timeliness of flights, safety for passengers, and more efficient planes, is likely to be a trend extending into the future.If you like what you see, keep going: Review: Attention All Passengers by William J McGee

Helicopters in History: At War and Peace

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The first helicopter type aircraft was the autogyro.This was a vertical take off and landing aircraft with the properties of a standard aircraft in forward propulsion by a front mounted engine but having a rotor that provided the lift. these aircraft were developed in the 1930's Igor Sikorsky is acknowledged as having developed the first practical, successful helicopter in 1939. Autogyros were used on a small scale by German and Japanese military forces in WW II. The first Sikorsky helicopters were used for rescue missions in the Far East by US Army Air Corps units.The full explanation can be found at http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/07/11/helicopters-in-hamptons-problems-within-vacationing-1/

By the lats 1940's helicopter innovation and development was in full throttle and many manufacturers sought to market vehicles for multiple uses. The Navy used helicopters for rescue and transport duties on carriers while the Army and Air Force used Bell helicopters for forward med-evac. Large scale transport helicopters were developed as well.

The Russians developed giant Mil transport helicopters and pioneered helicopter gunships. The gunships saw employment in the ill-fated Afghanistan campaign and were "out-gunned" by the insurgents who regularly shot down at them from mountain tops.

Today the Apache and Cheyenne gunships lead the way in ground attack warfare and the helicopter is very much a part of military strategy in all hemispheres.

History of the Blue Angles: 1946-201

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Founded in 1946, the Blue Angels are the United States Navy's flight demonstration squad. They are the second oldest such squad in the world. Currently, the Blue Angels fly the F/A-18 Hornet in air shows throughout the United States, but some of the techniques used in those shows date back to the squad's beginnings, when they flew Grumman F6F-5 Hellcats in simulated dogfights with an SNJ Texan painted to look like a Japanese Zero.

The Blue Angels were the brainchild of Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Chester Nimitz, who sought to boost Navy morale and generate public interest in naval aviation, as well as gain political support for the shrinking defense budget.Additional information can be found at http://www.wjla.com/articles/2012/05/blue-angels-to-take-flight-during-air-show--76110.html. The first test flight was on May 10, 1946 over the Florida Everglades, so chosen because, according to squad leader Lt. Commander Roy Marlin Voris, "only the alligators would know" if anything went wrong. It didn't and the Blue Angels were an immediate hit with the Navy.

Over the next seven decades, the Blue Angels performed to thrilled, adoring crowds at home and in tours abroad. The squad was disbanded during the Korean War so the pilots could fly in the conflict, but was re-commissioned once the war was over.

Still flying today, the Blue Angels demonstrate the precision and dedication of American naval aviation.






Lone Eagle: The Life of Charles Lindbergh

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Charles Lindbergh is quite possibly the best known pilot in history. Born in 1902, Lindbergh became the first person to successfully fly a solo non-stop flight across the Atlantic in 1927. Lindbergh's famous flight took off near New York City and landed near Paris, France, a distance of about 3,600 miles. Prior to his feat, Lindbergh was a 25-year-old United States Air Mail pilot and an officer in the United States Air Corps Reserve.

His impressive feat made him on of the most famous men in America, and he even earned acclaim worldwide after winning the Orteig Prize of 25,000. The French Foreign Office saluted Lindbergh, an honor given for the first time to someone who was not a head of state. President Calvin Coolidge awarded Lindbergh with the Distinguished Flying Cross after his return to the United States.

After flying the Spirit of St. Louis across the Atlantic, Lindbergh's life involved a great deal of controversy. Kidnappers captured and murdered his infant son in what was dubbed "the crime of the century" in 1932. Lindbergh preferred that the United States remain neutral during the early European phase of World War II and was thought by some to be a Nazi, although he changed his mind after Pearl Harbor. Lindbergh died in 1974.

The History of The Search for Amelia Earhart

12:00 am | Comments Off
The enigma of Amelia Earhart's journey is still one of the most targeted topics. Even though 75 years have gone by, her mysterious disappearance is haunting and it is being explored and investigated by the enthusiasts of the aviation history.
Interestingly enough, Amelia became enticed by airplane racing in her early twenties. She was always considered controversial as her interests did not mirror the lady-like behavior of the era. She climbed trees as a child, and became fascinated by the male dominated professions such as law, mechanical engineering and advertising.
Amelia had her first flying lesson in 1921 when she fell in love with the idea and decided to pursue her passion. She was able to purchase her first plane six months later. It was painted bright yellow, so she named it Canary. She used it to set her first record by raising the plane to an altitude of 14,000 feet. This accomplishment made her visible within the world of aviation and further accelerated her infatuation for flying.
The recent news project Amelia's possible emergency landing at the Nikumaroro Island in the Pacific where she might have landed and had no means of communicating her location. Her partner Fred Noonan has been assumed to land with Amelia. Many artifacts have been found on the island, but none of them are linking directly to Amelia or Fred.
The hits keep comin': Search for Amelia Earhart Begins Off Hawaii